Moose to Moccasins: The Story of Ka Kita Wa Pa No Kwe

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A great-grandmother tells what it was like living on the land when Indian families were struggling against the destructive values of an alien culture.

 

 

This is the story of the woman called Watchegou by her grandmother because she peeked into a room before entering it; Ka Kita Wa Pa No Kwe or Wise Day Woman, another of her names; and Madeline Katt Theriault, the name by which she became known in later life. With old family photos to accompany the stories of her life, this mother, grandmother and great-grandmother tells what it was like living on the land in a time when Indian families, who had always adapted to change, were struggling against the destructive values of an alien culture. “I remember the pines,” she begins, “the great white pines, the cedars by the shore. The pine cones on the forest floor, the little clearing for our summer tents. There were no docks, only the canoes drawn up on the shores, no kickers, only the calm of the water, occasionally broken by the steamboat. Everyone paddled then, even the tourists….This is my story. This is my story as I remember from my early days…”

 

 

Author: Madeline Katt Theriault (Ojibwe)

Illustrations: Black and white photos

Binding Availability: Paperback

Published: (1992) 2006

Tribes/Ethnic Groups: Ojibwe